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State Plan for Independent Living (SPIL) for California for 2014 - 2016

Part II: Narrative

Section 1: Goals, Objectives and Activities 

1.1: Goals and Mission
Describe the overall goals and mission of the State's IL programs and services. The SPIL must address the goals and mission of both the SILS and the CIL programs, including those of the State agency for individuals who are blind as they relate to the parts of the SPIL administered by that agency.

Goal Name: Enhancing Community Organizing
Goal Description: As a means to achieve lasting, grassroots change, members of the Independent Living (IL) network enhance their community organizing efforts.

Goal Name: Transitioning Successfully into Community
Goal Description: Individuals currently residing in institutions transition successfully into community settings.

Goal Name:Building Internal Capacity
Goal Description: Members of the IL network build internal capacity through revenue-generating activities and/or formalized partnerships with other networks and organizations.

Goal Name:Achieving greater long-term stability
Goal Description: In order to build a more robust statewide system, the IL network will achieve greater long-term stability.

Goal Name: MISSION STATEMENT mission of the CA state independent living (SILs) program
Goal Description: To influence policy and access to service delivery for all individuals with disabilities in California.

1.2: Objectives

1.2A. Specify the objectives to be achieved and the time frame for achieving them.

Goal(s) from Section 1.1 Objective to be achieved Time frame start date Time frame end date
Enhancing Community Organizing

1.1 A systems change program provides members of the IL network with technical assistance on community organizing topics

10/01/2013 09/30/2016
Enhancing Community Organizing

1.2 Members of the IL network increase community engagement in events.

10/01/2013 09/30/2016
Enhancing Community Organizing

1.3 Through community organizing, members of the IL network achieve "policy wins" (changes to local or regional policy on issues such as housing, employment, etc.) that can clearly be attributed to community organizing.

10/01/2013 09/30/2016
Transitioning Successfully into Community

2.1 Funds awarded to Independent Living Centers (ILCs) through the transition fund support the movement of individuals from institutions into the community.

10/01/2013 09/30/2016
Transitioning Successfully into Community

2.2 Individuals who transition out of nursing homes are assessed on their quality of life through the survey used by the California Community Transitions (CCT) program.

10/01/2013 09/30/2016
Building Internal Capacity

3.2 IL network entities partner with other networks and organizations to generate revenue for their programs.

10/01/2013 09/30/2016
Achieving greater long-term stability

4.1 A working group will propose a more equitable funding formula with feedback from stakeholders including interested ILCs.

10/01/2013 09/30/2016
Achieving greater long-term stability 4.2 A working group of interested members of the IL network propose changes to simplify and improve current data and reporting requirements. 10/01/2013 09/30/2016
Achieving greater long-term stability

4.3 IL network entities designated "in need" receive technical assistance from a contractor hired using 7B funds.

10/01/2013 09/30/2016
Achieving greater long-term stability

4.4 IL network entities designated "in need" develop a mentorship relationship with a successful member of the IL network. The mentorship program will be facilitated and monitored by a contractor hired using 7B funds.

10/01/2013 09/30/2016

 

1.2: Objectives

1.2B: Describe the steps planned regarding outreach to populations in the State that are unserved or underserved by programs under title VII, including minority groups and urban and rural populations.

  • Identify the populations to be designated for targeted outreach efforts

    The 2012 Needs Assessment identified the populations and geographic areas most in need of additional IL services. This report used administrative data from Independent Living Center reports (704 reports); the American Community Survey (ACS); the Department of Developmental Services (DDS); the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA); and the Department of Rehabilitation (DOR) Survey of Languages. It also used data from two surveys conducted specifically for the assessment, the first with ILC Directors and the second with members of the wider IL Network. Additionally, the SILC held public meetings to determine if other groups might also benefit from targeted outreach efforts. The assessment calculated penetration rates: the share of the total population of individuals with disabilities who have received services. For each of these rates, the numerator was the number of individuals served (from 704 reports). The denominator was the total number of individuals with disabilities. The assessment identified five ILCs as "highly in need" of additional services, all located in inland areas of the state. ILCs with the lowest penetration rates also had the highest share of individuals in poverty. Individuals with cognitive, hearing, and vision disabilities are most in need of additional services. Among individuals with disabilities, Asian Americans had the lowest penetration rate. Surveys indicated that Tagalog was the least served language. Both ILC directors and members of the IL network identified transportation, location, and cost as the most common barriers to accessing services. Based on feedback from the surveys and meetings, California identified additional populations in need: youth; individuals with brain injuries; and individuals who are lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT). Funding priority will be given to projects that increase services to one or more of these populations.

  • Identify the geographic areas (i.e., communities) in which the targeted populations reside

    As mentioned above, the needs assessment identified geographic areas most in need of additional services or targeted outreach. The needs assessment identified five ILCs as "highly in need" of additional services. All five ILC catchment areas identified as "highly in need" were located in inland areas of the state. The five ILCs identified as "highly in need" were the following: Resources for Independence, Central Valley: Fresno, Kings, Madera, Merced, Tulare Community Access Center: Riverside Disability Resource Agency for Independent Living: Amador, Calaveras, Mariposa, San Joaquin, Stanislaus, Tuolumne Rolling Start, Inc.: Inyo, Mono, San Bernardino Resources for Independent Living: Sacramento, Yolo. Additionally, in general, ILCs with the lowest penetration rates also seemed to have the highest share of individuals in poverty. For this reason, California is targeting services regions with high levels of poverty, even if they do not fall in the areas identified in the table above. Finally, access to transportation was identified as a primary barrier to service delivery. For this reason, projects that serve individuals in areas with limited transportation may receive priority to address an underserved community even in an urban area.

  • Describe how the needs of individuals with significant disabilities from minority group backgrounds will be addressed

    As mentioned above among individuals with disabilities, Asian Americans appeared to be the least comprehensively served by the IL network. Aside from individuals with two or more races listed, Asian Americans with a disability have the lowest penetration rate. While language was not calculated in penetration rates, surveys indicated that Tagalog was the least served language. In addition to information gathered from the needs assessment, California examined groups that were consistently identified as underserved from other methods such as community forums. From this, California decided to add additional focus to three groups not included in the needs assessment. These groups are individuals with disabilities who also are youth; have brain injuries; or are lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT).

1.3: Financial Plan

Describe in sections 1.3A and 1.3B, below, the financial plan for the use of Federal and non-Federal funds to meet the SPIL objectives.

1.3A: Financial Plan Tables

Complete the financial plan tables covering years 1, 2 and 3 of this SPIL. For each funding source, provide estimated dollar amounts anticipated for the applicable uses. The financial plan table should include only those funding sources and amounts that are intended to support one or more of the objectives identified in section 1.2 of the SPIL. To the extent possible, the tables and narratives must reflect the applicable financial information from centers for independent living. Refer to the SPIL Instructions for additional information about completing the financial tables and narratives.

Year 1 - 2014 Approximate funding amounts and uses

Sources SILC resource plan IL services General CIL operations Other SPIL activities
Title VII Funds        
Title VII Funds Chapter 1, Part B 516600     1553937
Title VII Funds Chapter 1, Part C     7385289  
Title VII Funds Chapter 2, OIB (only those provided by the OIB grantee to further a SPIL objective)        
Other Federal funds - Sec. 101(a)(18) of the Act (Innovation and Expansion)        
Other Federal funds - other     12498000  
Non-Federal funds - State funds 57400     172660
Non-Federal funds - Other        
         
Total 574000 0 19883289 1726597

Year 2 - 2015 Approximate funding amounts and uses

Sources SILC resource plan IL services General CIL operations Other SPIL activities
Title VII Funds        
Title VII Funds Chapter 1, Part B 516600     1464177
Title VII Funds Chapter 1, Part C     7815720  
Title VII Funds Chapter 2, OIB (only those provided by the OIB grantee to further a SPIL objective)        
Other Federal funds - Sec. 101(a)(18) of the Act (Innovation and Expansion)        
Other Federal funds - other     12498000  
Non-Federal funds - State funds 57400     162686
Non-Federal funds - Other        
         
Total 574000 0 20313720 1626863

Year 3 - 2016 Approximate funding amounts and uses

Sources SILC resource plan IL services General CIL operations Other SPIL activities
Title VII Funds        
Title VII Funds Chapter 1, Part B 516600     1463677
Title VII Funds Chapter 1, Part C     7815720  
Title VII Funds Chapter 2, OIB (only those provided by the OIB grantee to further a SPIL objective)        
Other Federal funds - Sec. 101(a)(18) of the Act (Innovation and Expansion)        
Other Federal funds - other     12498000  
Non-Federal funds - State funds 57400     162631
Non-Federal funds - Other        
         
Total 574000 0 20313720 1626308

 

1.3B: Financial Plan Narratives

1.3B(1) Specify how the part B, part C and chapter 2 (Older Blind) funds, if applicable, will further the SPIL objectives.

N/A

1.3B(2) Describe efforts to coordinate Federal and State funding for centers and IL services, including the amounts, sources and purposes of the funding to be coordinated.

The coordination of federal and state funding for Centers and IL services is addressed through the planning framework that is incorporated in this SPIL, under Section 3, the Statewide Network. This document describes the allocation of both federal and state resources among Independent Living Centers in California. In addition to describing the current allocation of such resources, the document also sets forth a plan for how additional state and federal resources would be used to fund Center services. This framework for allocating federal and state funding is the result of collaboration and cooperation between the SILC, the California Independent Living Network and the DSU. Since the mid-nineties, the DSU has provided Social Security reimbursements for independent living services. In 2013, this amount was $12,498,000 from SSA Program Income to the California Independent Living Centers. Both Part C funds and SSA Program Income will be used for core IL services. This additional annual funding will be provided on an ongoing basis so long as the SSA Program Income continues to be available to the DSU. As a result of a SILC study in 1998, "Funding Independent Living Centers in California" the SILC and the DSU reached an agreement with RSA that new Title VII C funds (after COLAs) would be distributed according to a formula which complements, but is not identical to, the one set forth in State statutes. These funds will be allocated to the 28 State recognized Independent Living Corporations using a funding formula. As part of this SPIL, California will convene a workgroup to propose a new, more equitable formula to allocate funds to centers. The California Independent Living Community does not intend to alter the existing 7C grant awards in any way.

Further, in recognition of the critical importance of IL services to Californians with disabilities, the DSU agreed to work with the ILCs to develop new areas of service collaboration for consumers who require both VR and IL services. Groups of consumers who could benefit from such collaboration include, but are not limited to, transition age youth, and persons surviving traumatic brain injury. These joint collaborative efforts will be documented, as appropriate, in the annual 704 report and in future amendments to the State Plan for Independent Living (SPIL).

1.3B(3) Describe any in-kind resources including plant, equipment or services to be provided in support of the SILC resource plan, IL services, general CIL operations and/or other SPIL objectives.

The majority of the resources provided in support of the SILC resource plan, IL services, general CIL operations and/or other SPIL objectives (such as described in 4.1A in 1.3B3) are not in-kind -- they are paid for using Part VII B funds.

However, the time and travel expenses for Megan Juring, Deputy Director, Independent Living and External Affairs are an in-kind contribution from the DSU and the State of California. Ms. Juring was recently appointed to be the Ex-Officio representing the DSU on the SILC and her expenses are funded through other sources and could be viewed as "in-kind" support to the IL Network in California.

1.3B(4) Provide any additional information about the financial plan, as appropriate.

This SPIL establishes priorities to utilize unspent Title VII, Part B funds during the SPIL 2014-2016. The State Plan Partners need an efficient way to maximize these scarce resources. The competitive priorities identified during SPIL formulation allowed the SILC to develop objectives and allocate funds for many different initiatives. However, there are more unmet needs to address.

As a result, California SILC will work with the DSU to identify any unspent Part B amounts on a quarterly basis. During January, California SILC will be notified of the amount of unspent Part B money. At their next quarterly meeting, California SILC will then meet to make recommendations for the best use of the funds according to the following criteria:

  1. To enhance the funding level for any existing SPIL objectives to maximize their success.
  2. To fund projects prioritized during the SPIL formulation process that did not receive any resources.
  3. To fund any urgent or emerging priorities identified.

1.4 Compatibility with Chapter 1 of Title VII and the CIL Work Plans

1.4A Describe how the SPIL objectives are consistent with and further the purpose of chapter 1 of title VII of the Act as stated in section 701 of the Act and 34 CFR 364.2.

  1. Enhancing Community Organizing
    • Promoting a philosophy of independent living (IL), including a philosophy of self-help, self-determination, equal access, and individual and system advocacy, to maximize the leadership, empowerment, independence, and productivity of individuals with significant disabilities, and to promote and maximize the integration and full inclusion of individuals with significant disabilities into the mainstream of American society.
    • Maximizing leadership, empowerment, and independence for individuals with disabilities.
  2. Transitioning Successfully into Community
    • Maximizing the integration and full inclusion of individuals with significant disabilities into the mainstream of society.
  3. Building Internal Capacity
    • Developing and supporting the statewide network of centers for independent living and other providers.
  4. Achieving greater long-term stability
    • Improving working relationships by collaborating on disability issues through which IL philosophy can be promoted and peer support can be engendered.

1.4B Describe how, in developing the SPIL objectives, the DSU and the SILC considered and incorporated, where appropriate, the priorities and objectives established by centers for independent living under section 725(c)(4) of the Act.

The DSU and the SILC considered and included center priorities and objectives using several methods. During the Needs Assessment phase, all centers were invited to submit responses to two surveys that were conducted of IL directors and the IL network. Researchers also reviewed all 704 reports for the State of California. Strategic planning sessions were held at several SILC quarterly meetings and ILC directors and the public were able to provide feedback on defining the Vision, Mission, and Goals. Additionally, a SPIL Working Group Ad Hoc committee was formed in November 2012 that met publicly via teleconference twice monthly and was composed of SILC members, DSU staff, and ILC personnel. Finally, the SPIL Working Group posted draft versions of the SPIL goals and objectives and collected public feedback between March and May 2013.

1.5 Cooperation, Coordination, and Working Relationships Among Various Entities

Describe the steps that will be taken to maximize the cooperation, coordination and working relationships among the SILS program, the SILC, and centers; the DSU, other State agencies represented on the SILC and other councils that address the needs of specific disability populations and issues; and other public and private entities determined to be appropriate by the SILC.

The description must identify the entities with which the DSU and the SILC will cooperate and coordinate.

Cooperation and collaboration are integral features of the Independent Living program in California. This mindset allows us to maximize scarce resources so we can reach more unserved and underserved individuals through the organizations they visit and provide better services to them. By establishing more partnerships, organizations can educate each other, share best practices, stimulate creative thinking and problem-solving, enhance access to mutual consumers and needed services, and address emerging and complex needs more fully and deeply. Collaboration also promotes expansion of relationship circles and connections to decision-makers who can eliminate barriers to independent living. Finally, collaboration leverages funding and decreases the possibility of duplicated services.

  1. Description of collaborating entities.

    Major partners in the state Independent Living Network include the DSU, SILC, CFILC, and the ILCs. DOR serves as the DSU, controlling funds and ensuring legal compliance. SILC supports the DSU in planning VIIB allocation, collecting testimony and needs information around the state, and having public forums to discuss the DSU's work to advance independent living. CFILC is a membership for the majority of independent living centers in California and they support the ILCs programmatically as well as with coordinating projects with one another. The Independent Living Centers provide services to people with disabilities in their local communities and also advocate to remove barriers that prevent people with disabilities from living independently.

    The SILC includes representatives from many members of the IL Network including four ILC Directors, a metropolitan ADA coordinator, representatives from the brain injury survivor community, a youth organizer, a VR 121 Representative, an SRC member, and Ex-Officios from the Departments of Rehabilitation, Developmental Services, Social Services, and Aging.

    The DSU and the SILC will cooperate and coordinate with many state agency partners as well as private corporations. An incomplete list follows: California Health and Human Services Agency, Departments of Aging, Health Care Services, Public Health (including the Office of Health Equity), Social Services, Mental Health Services Oversight and Accountability Commission, Developmental Services, Transportation, Housing and Community Development, Emergency Management Agency; The Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development and Client Assistance Programs; Boards/Commissions/Councils on Aging, Developmental Disabilities, California Committee on Employment of People with Disabilities, and Mental Health Planning Council; Membership associations such as Traumatic Brain Injury Services of CA, California Association of Area Agencies on Aging, CA Association of Public Authorities, and California Association of Caregiver Resource Centers; Not-for-profit corporations such as Disability Rights California, Disability Rights Legal Center, World Institute on Disability, Californians for Disability Rights and Disability Rights Advocates; Statewide coalitions such as the California Network of Mental Health Clients, CA Council of the Blind, National Federation for the Blind of CA, CA Coalition for Long Term Services and Supports, and many others.
  2. SILC's role in accomplishing the plan is to advise the DSU about unmet needs and emerging needs, and to facilitate discussions about unspent funds, program effectiveness, and other kinds of evaluation. SILC also takes responsibility for implementing some of the other SPIL projects, especially those related to increasing services to underserved, underrepresented populations.
  3. ILCs helped design the plan and they also implement some of the activities. Some of this implementation occurs at every center, such as the diversity plans they each create, and some of the implementation occurs on a larger scale when one of the centers wins a grant competition to execute an activity from the SPIL.
  4. The DSU has an extensive role in accomplishing the plan. They control all the non part C funds related to independent living. They write requests for grant applications, hold competitions, and award grants so that entities can complete the SPIL activities. The DSU provides technical assistance to all the ILCs and conducts compliance reviews to ensure the Rehabilitation Act is implemented according to law.
  5. Partners collaborate on many levels, attending each others' meetings and holding joint meetings and conferences. Most large-scale outcomes are evidence of the high level of collaboration within the state. All the major partners communicate via teleconferences, e-mail, face-to-face meetings, staffing public meetings, reviewing and commenting on documents, etc.

1.6 Coordination of Services

Describe how IL services funded under chapter 1 of title VII of the Act will be coordinated with and complement other services to avoid unnecessary duplication with other Federal, State, and local programs, including the OIB program authorized by chapter 2 of title VII of the Act, that provide IL- or VR-related services.

Centers that provide significant levels of employment services do so under contract with the vocational rehabilitation program, thus using funds under Title I of the Act. All centers in California provide some level of services to older blind individuals; however, they focus on the services at which they excel and leave the specialized services to the programs funded under Chapter 2 - three of these programs are independent living centers.

As well, ILCs coordinate services with local services and programs to meet the needs of the communities they serve and to avoid duplication of services. Local CIL coordination includes providing Veterans, Mental Health, Housing, and Youth Transition services and assistance with Individual Education Plans. Some ILCs are lead organizations for California Community Transitions, Money Follows the Person, demonstration project providing Medi-Cal services for transitioning individuals into community living. A number of ILCs also coordinate services through local Aging and Disability Resource Centers.

The DOR, SILC, and ILC Directors and staff serve on various committees and councils to assist with the coordination of services. Coordination is achieved through the California Foundation of Independent Living Centers Systems change and Assistive Technology Networks, Workforce Investment Boards, both local and statewide, and California Committee on Employment of People with Disabilities. The Youth Leadership Forum is a collaboration between DOR, SILC, ILCs, and DDS.

1.7 Independent Living Services for Individuals who are Older Blind

Describe how the DSU seeks to incorporate into, and describe in, the State plan any new methods or approaches for the provision of IL services to older individuals who are blind that are developed under the Older Individuals who are Blind program and that the DSU determines to be effective.

The Independent Living Services Program for individuals who are 55 years of age or older and blind or visually impaired is administered by the DSU through the Specialized Services Division. While IL Services developed under the OIB program are not detailed in this SPIL, the DSU will work carefully with the OIB program to gather relevant information that meets the criteria stated above. The Independent Living Section of the DSU regularly works with the OIB Unit on tasks they have in common, so there is an established relationship and communication channel between the programs.

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